Diet / Diet

 

Dietary Component of the Programme

Phase 1

Phase 2

Low Calorie Diet

Multidisciplinary Approach

 

 


Dietary Component of the Programme


At Glasgow & Clyde Weight Management Service (GCWMS), people are encouraged to take a fresh look at weight loss and challenge the notion of ‘going on a diet’.

Unlike some ‘fad’ or ‘crash’ diets GCWMS is based on current expert opinion and research evidence.

Patients are asked to explore not only what they eat, but also when they eat, why they eat and how they eat.

GCWMS encourage dietary and lifestyle changes that are realistic, achievable and that can be sustained in the long-term. The focus is improvement in health through healthy eating and realistic weight loss rather than striving for the perfect figure or an ideal bodyweight.
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Phase 1


In the first phase of the programme, a Personalised Dietary Prescription (PDP) is calculated based on gender, weight and level of physical activity. The PDP is a 600 calorie deficit eating plan based on The Eatwell Plate. The Eatwell Plate outlines a healthy, nutritionally balanced diet that allows personal food choices and is not overly restrictive.



The target weight loss in Phase 1 is 5-10kg (11.5lbs to 1.5stone). This means a steady weight loss of 0.5-1kg (1-2lbs) a week.

The benefits of 5-10kg weights have been shown to include:
  • Reduced Cholesterol
  • Reduced Blood Pressure
  • Reduced Blood Sugar Levels in those with Diabetes
  • Improved Mobility
  • Reduces the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Attack, Angina, Stroke, Some Cancers
  • Increased Fertility (contact The Sandyford Initiative for more information)

The programme is delivered in a group setting. This encourages discussion and sharing of ideas. Many patients find the groups supportive, informative and enjoyable.

Dietary topics covered in the Phase 1 include:
  • The Eatwell Plate (The Balance of Good Health)
  • Energy Equation
  • Meal Patterns
  • Keeping a Food Diary
  • Portion control
  • Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption
  • Cooking, Eating Out and Takeaways
  • Dietary Myths and Fad Diets
  • Practical Tips and Recipes
  • Shopping and Food Labelling
  • Alcohol consumption
Patients are weighed privately at each session; patient confidentiality is strictly observed.
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Phase 2


In Phase 2 of the programme additional methods of weight loss are offered if the Phase 1 weight loss target has not been achieved: see Programme Overview.

The two choices offered in Phase 2 are:
  • Trial course of Xenical
  • Low Calorie Diet

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Low Calorie Diet


As part of a specialist treatment plan GCWMS have developed a structured low calorie diet (LCD). This is offered to patients who have not achieved a 5kg weight loss using the PDP. The LCD is useful to support patients to introduce a regular eating pattern, which is very important in achieving success with weight loss.

The LCD contains meal choices with specific calorie controlled portion sizes to give patients an exact meal plan to follow. It consists of:

 

Breakfast           300 calories                         

Lunch                400 calories               

Evening meal    500 calories     =     1200 calories per day     

3 additional snacks of 100 calories each may also be included    =     1500 calories per day

 

Patients can opt for a 1200 calorie plan or a 1500 calorie plan, which the Dietitian would advise on, based on their PDP in Phase 1.

 

Meal replacements have been included as part of the LCD as a substitute for breakfast and  lunch. These can be useful for patients who have struggled to eat regular meals and can fit easily into a busy lifestyle. 

 

Meal replacements are only recommended for a 3 month period to support weight loss. GCWMS then offer a year-long weight maintenance programme to support patients with food re-introduction and weight maintenance.

Multidisciplinary Approach

Phases 1 and 2 of the weight management programme are delivered by Dietitians with support from other members of the GCWMS team. Physical Activity and the Behavioural aspects of weight management are widely discussed throughout Phases 1 and 2.

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